Official Selenium Blog

October 13, 2016

Selenium 3.0: Out Now!

Filed under: Releases — shs96c @ 6:39 pm UTC

We are very pleased to announce the release of Selenium 3.0. If you’ve been waiting for a stable release since 2.53.1, now’s your chance to update. And if you do, here is what you’ll find:

As we’ve said before, for users of the WebDriver APIs this is a drop-in replacement. You’ll find that modern browsers, such as Chrome and Edge will continue to work just as before, and we’ve taken the opportunity to fix some bugs and improve stability. Selenium Grid users may require updates to their configuration as the json config file format has been updated, as have some of command line parameter options, but the upgrade should also be smooth. 

The major change in Selenium 3.0 is we’re removing the original Selenium Core implementation and replacing it with one backed by WebDriver. This will affect all users of the Selenium RC APIs. For more information, please see the previous post.

A lot has changed in the 5 years between versions 2 and 3. When we shipped Selenium 2, the Selenium project was responsible for providing the driver for each browser. Now, we are happy to say that all the major browser vendors ship their own implementations (Apple, Google, Microsoft, and Mozilla). Because the browser vendors know their browsers better than anyone, their WebDriver implementations can be tightly coupled to the browser, leading to a better testing experience for you.

The other notable change has been that there is now a W3C specification for browser automation, based on the Open Source WebDriver. This has yet to reach “recommendation” status, but the people working on it (including members of the Selenium project!) are now focusing on finishing the text and writing the implementations.

Mozilla has been a front-runner in implementing the W3C WebDriver protocol. On the plus side, this has exposed problems with the spec as it has evolved, but it also means that Firefox support is hard to track as their engineering efforts have been forward looking, rather than on supporting the current wire protocol used by Selenium WebDriver. For now, the best advice we can offer is for you to try the latest release of geckodriver and Selenium together.

These are exciting times for browser automation! Selenium 3.0 is a major release and we’re looking forward to improving things further, as well as tracking the ongoing work of the W3C spec. Our goal is to keep the changes your tests need to deal with to an absolute minimum, to continue preserving the hard work that’s gone into writing your existing tests. 

As a personal note, I’d like to say thank you to each of the many people that have worked so hard to make Selenium 3 possible. That’s not just the developers and contributors to the Open Source project (past and present), but also the engineers from Google, Microsoft, Mozilla, and Apple, and everyone involved with the W3C spec. I’d also like to say thank you to everyone who’s taken the time to report bugs, our users and our community. The project is great fun to work on and you’re the reason for that. A final thank you is due to the Software Freedom Conservancy, who have provided invaluable help with the logistics of running a large OSS project.

 
Happy hacking, everyone! May your tests run fast and true!

October 4, 2016

Selenium 3 is Coming

Filed under: Releases — shs96c @ 3:59 pm UTC

Selenium 3 is coming! As I write this, we think that “beta 4” will be the last beta before the official 3.0 release. I’m here to tell you about what’s changed, and what impact this will have on your testing.

TL;DR:

  • WebDriver users will just find bug fixes and a drop-in replacement for 2.x.
  • Selenium Grid users will also find bug fixes and a simple update.
  • The WebDriver APIs are now the only APIs actively supported by the Selenium project.
  • The Selenium RC APIs have been moved to a “legacy” package.
  • The original code powering Selenium RC has been replaced with something backed by WebDriver, which is also contained in the “legacy” package.
  • By a quirk of timing, Mozilla have made changes to Firefox that mean that from Firefox 48 you must use their geckodriver to use that browser, regardless of whether you’re using Selenium 2 or 3.

In more depth:

When we released Selenium 2.0 in 2011, we introduced the new WebDriver APIs, and encouraged everyone to start moving to them. If you’re using the WebDriver APIs, then Selenium 3.0 is a simple drop-in upgrade. We’ve not changed any of the public WebDriver APIs, and the code is essentially the same as the last 2.x release. If you’re using Selenium Grid, the same applies: in most cases, you can just drop in the new JAR (or update your maven dependency to 3.0.0), and you’re done.

If the update to Selenium 3 is such a non-event, why did we call this Selenium 3.0? To answer this question, I first need to provide some history, and tell you a little about how Selenium works under the hood. The very first version of Selenium was “just” a very complicated Javascript framework, running in the browser and interpreting the table-based tests you may be familiar with if you use Selenium IDE. We call this “Selenium Core”. This Javascript framework formed the basis of the original implementation of Selenium RC (the oldest set of Selenium APIs, where all the method and functions were on the “Selenium” interface, and which have been deprecated for some time now). Over time, the needs of modern web testing have grown ever more complicated and sophisticated, and Selenium Core is now less capable of meeting these needs than it was before.

With Selenium 3.0, we are deleting the original Selenium Core implementation. If you use the old RC interfaces, we provide an alternative implementation that’s backed by WebDriver. This is the same “webdriver-backed selenium” that has been available as part of Selenium 2 since its release. Because the underlying technology has changed from Selenium Core to WebDriver, you may find some places where your existing tests using RC run into issues. Our experience with migrating suites is that it’s normally a systemic issue that can be fixed with a minimal engineering effort (that is, the problem is normally isolated to a few places, and these can be rewritten to avoid problems)

We’re also removing the original Selenium RC APIs from the main downloads. If you’re a Java user, and need to use them to support existing tests, then you’ll need a dependency to “org.seleniumhq.selenium:selenium-leg-rc:3.0.0” (or later!). It’s strongly recommended that you do not do this unless you absolutely need to.
If you’re someone who runs tests exported from IDE in the table format, there is now a new test runner that the project has made available for you to use that can be downloaded from the project’s website. It takes the same arguments as the old runner, and we’ve done our best to ensure the output of tests remains the same too.

At the same time as the Selenium project is shipping Selenium 3.0, Mozilla are changing the internals of Firefox in a way that makes it more stable and secure, but which also makes the community provided Firefox Driver no longer work. As such, if you use Firefox for your testing, you’ll need to use the geckodriver, which is an executable similar to the chromedriver and the Microsoft WebDriver for Edge. You’ll need to start using geckodriver even if you’re using Selenium 2 — the change is in the browser, not Selenium. Please be aware that geckodriver is alpha software, based on the evolving W3C WebDriver standard: everyone’s working flat out to give you the best testing experience they can, but there are undoubtedly some bumps in the road when it comes to testing with Firefox.

This release marks the culmination of a lot of hard work by the Selenium committers and community. I’d like to thank everyone who has been part of this process, and the Selenium users around the world who have done so much to make the project as successful as it is.

July 29, 2016

Announcing Selenium 3.0-beta1

Filed under: Releases — shs96c @ 1:20 am UTC

At SeleniumConf in 2013, we announced that a new major version of Selenium would be released “by Christmas”. Fortunately, we never said which Christmas, as it has taken us a while to make all the changes we wanted to make! We’re excited to announce the release of the first beta — Selenium 3.0.0-beta1.

We’d love you to try it out on your projects, and provide us with feedback on where the rough edges are before we ship the 3.0 itself! Please remember that this is a beta release, so your feedback is incredibly helpful and valuable in order to help us smooth any rough edges.

For the last six years we’ve been advising users to switch to the newer WebDriver APIs and to stop using the original RC APIs. With Selenium 3.0, the original implementation of RC has been removed, replaced by one that sits on top of WebDriver. For many users, this change will go completely unnoticed, as they’re no longer using the RC APIs. For those of you who still are, we’ve done our best to make the change as smooth as possible, but we welcome high quality bug reports to help us fix any problems that occur. Maven users will need to add a dependency on the new “leg-rc” package to access the old RC APIs.

There are some other changes that you might need to be aware of:

  • You’ll need to be running Java 8 to use the Java pieces of Selenium. This is the oldest version of Java officially supported by Oracle, so hopefully you’re using it already!
  • Support for Firefox is via Mozilla’s geckodriver.
  • Support for Safari is provided on macOS (Sierra or later) via Apple’s own safaridriver.
  • Support for Edge is provided by MS through their webdriver server.
  • Only versions 9 or above of IE are supported. Earlier versions may work, but are no longer supported as MS no longer supports them.

We’ll be posting more information about Selenium 3.0 to this blog soon, but until then if you’re interested in learning more then a recent webinar by Simon is a great place to start.

August 28, 2013

The Road to Selenium 3

Filed under: Releases — shs96c @ 1:33 pm UTC

Selenium 2 was released in July 2011. It’s now two years old, and what a couple of years it’s been! The WebDriver APIs, which were the major addition in Selenium 2, are now the basis for a W3C standard, and there are implementations written and supported by Google, Mozilla and Opera. There have been 34 releases, with official support for Java, C#, Python, Ruby and Javascript, and the community has stepped in to provide bindings for Perl, PHP and others. There have been 57 different people authoring changes in the code base, and countless more participating in the online forums, offering help and advice.

While all this has been happening, the world has moved on, and now it’s time for the Selenium project to look to the future. It’s with great pleasure that I can now say that we’re working towards Selenium 3.

We aim for Selenium 3 to be “a tool for user-focused automation of mobile and web apps”.

What does this mean? For mobile users, the Selenium project will be hosting a suite of tests to facilitate interoperability between the many different projects available that are extending the WebDriver API to also cope with mobile. Developers from projects such as Appium, ios-driver and selendroid will be working on the suite of tests to enable this.

We’ll also be working on making the technology behind Selenium as stable and capable as possible. For this reason, Selenium 3 will see the removal of the original Selenium Core implementations, and consequently we’ll be deprecating the RC APIs too. The old versions will still be available as a separate download, but active development will cease, except for very urgent fixes. We will still be providing an implementation of the RC APIs backed by WebDriver, so you can continue running your existing tests, but now would be a great time to make the move to using the WebDriver APIs directly.

For those of you exporting your tests from IDE and running the HTML suites, we’ll provide an alternative runner that allows you to continue running those tests too, though it’ll be backed by the same “WebDriver-backed” RC implementation as offered by the main download. Again, the original implementation will be available as a download, but it will no longer be actively developed once we release 3.0.

Our current plan is to start shipping 3.0 by Christmas this year: it’s going to be a lot of fun!

May 29, 2012

Announcing Selenium 2.22

Filed under: Releases — shs96c @ 1:58 pm UTC

It’s been a while since the last Selenium release, but I’m happy to announce that Selenium 2.22 is now available for download. This is a big release for us and features two major changes.

The first is that Selenium 2.22 is the first version that requires Java 6 in order to run. This has been the case for the Selenium Server for some time, but this is the first time the client code has required Java 6. Since Java 5 was “end of lifed” in 2009, we don’t expect this to impact many users.

The second major change is that we are now providing a standalone IE server for use with the WebDriver API, similar to the one used by the chrome driver. You can get it from the normal download page. This will allow us to update our IE support independently of the rest of the library (again, mirroring how Chrome is supported) For now, there’s a legacy fallback mode you can use that’ll use the same DLL we’ve always used which can be activated by setting the DesiredCapability “useLegacyInternalServer” to boolean “true” when requesting your IE Driver instance.

Of course, as well as these major changes, there’s the usual host of updates and improvements. We’re continuing to refine the new SafariDriver, and we’re happy to announce native events for Firefox 12. You can check out the other updates in the CHANGELOG.

February 8, 2012

Announcing Selenium 2.19: the Prancing Unicorn release

Filed under: Releases — shs96c @ 4:53 pm UTC

You might be pleased to hear that Selenium 2.19 has been released (download it from here!). There’s one big user facing changing that we’d like to tell you about: the webdriver-backed selenium can now be used in supported languages.

By providing this capability, it’s possible to migrate from RC to the WebDriver APIs without rewriting all your tests in one fell swoop (which must be a Good Thing, right?) An example of how to use it in Python would be:

driver = RemoteWebDriver(desired_capabilities = DesiredCapabilities.FIREFOX)
selenium = DefaultSelenium('localhost', 4444', '*webdriver', 'http://www.google.com')
selenium.start(driver = driver)

Provided you keep a reference to the original webdriver and selenium objects you created you can use the two APIs interchangeably.  You’ll see that the magic is the “*webdriver” browser name passed to the selenium instance, and that we pass the webdriver instance when calling start().

We hope you like it!

PS: I have no idea why this is the Prancing Unicorn release, but it’s been a while since we named one 🙂

January 5, 2012

Selenium 2.16 Released: Welcome to 2012!

Filed under: Releases,Technical — shs96c @ 11:36 am UTC

It’s been a while since we last blogged about a Selenium release. Since the release of 2.0, we’ve been attempting to give you a fresh and shiny Selenium release every week (though, in reality, we’re managing to get you one every 10 days on average). This allows you to pick the version that’s most suitable for you and your teams, but provides a route for quick feedback on how we’re doing. I think we’ve now ironed out a lot of the initial problems and bumps we ran into, so we are extremely proud to announce the release of Selenium 2.16.

If you’re unsure about what’s been happening since the last time we announced a release here, the best place to look is our changelog. The most notable feature in 2.16 is better support for Firefox 9, but if it’s been a while since you’ve last updated, we’ve been beavering away on bug fixes and making existing features work as flawlessly as possible. Now’s a great time to update!

One of the key tools we use for assessing whether it’s okay to push a release is our continuous build. This watches for each and every change made to the project’s source code, and runs an increasingly vast suite of tests to verify that nothing has broken. Our friends at SauceLabs have been extremely generous in providing support for this, and have worked closely with us to make the build as stable and quick as possible. Special kudos and thanks to them!

October 20, 2011

Selenium 2.9 Released

Filed under: Releases — shs96c @ 11:55 pm UTC

We’re pleased to announce the release of Selenium 2.9. As well as improving the stability of Grid under high loads, we’ve added an experimental (and temporary!) feature that allows the Firefox driver to use a different mechanism for determining when a page is loaded. This is designed to handle the case where the driver appears to hang, as it’s waiting for all incoming requests to complete before continuing. How to enable this mode is listed in the changelog.

This release also includes an updated Android driver, allowing your tests to run on Ice Cream Sandwich devices.

October 6, 2011

Selenium 2.8 Released

Filed under: Releases — illicitonion @ 6:16 pm UTC

In keeping with our (roughly) weekly releases, Selenium 2.8 was released today (and on Maven too), with a *huge* list of bug-fixes!  As well as improved stability, if you’re using the Java API, this release adds the ability to upload files to a RemoteWebDriver server (see RemoteWebDriver.setFileDetector).

Particular thanks have to go out to our two newest committers, Alexei Barancev and Ajay Kemparaj, for the copious bug-fixes they’ve contributed!

We’re already hard at work getting 2.9 ready for next week with even more more bug-fixes – watch this space!

September 16, 2011

Selenium 2.6 Released

Filed under: Releases — shs96c @ 1:57 pm UTC

If you’ve been watching this blog carefully you’ll have noticed that the last release announcement we made was for 2.3, so it may come as a surprise that we’re announcing that 2.6 has been released (even on Maven!). Don’t worry: 2.4 and 2.5 were released on time and without muss or fuss. 2.6, on the other hand has been almost three weeks brewing.

Selenium 2.6 introduces a raft of improvements and stability fixes. Kristian Rosenvold has been working wonders on Grid 2.0, addressing many reported issues and cleaning up the implementation. In the finest tradition of the project, I now owe him a dinner for his hard work. Thank you, Kristian!

For those of you not using Grid, as well as the normal suite of bug fixes, Selenium 2.6 now supports all versions of Firefox from 3.0 up to 7. For those of you using Java, there is an ExpectedConditions class that supplies many useful criteria when using the Wait and WebDriverWait classes. The packaged version of the OperaDriver has also been bumped to 0.7.2, which works hand-in-hand with Opera 11.5 and above.

We’ve also spent a considerable amount of time and effort working out the kinks in the Advanced User Interactions API. We’d love to hear how you’re using it, and what the gaps are that you can see. For more details about what’s changed, have a look at the release notes.

The release frequency has dropped recently, but we’re planning to head back to weekly releases from here on in. 2.7 is just around the corner!

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