Official Selenium Blog

August 8, 2015

Selenium Conf 2015 Update

Filed under: Conference — Tour de Dave @ 3:00 pm UTC

Selenium 2015 is just around the corner (September 8-10). Since our last post we have:

  • confirmed Keynote speakers
  • finalized workshop presenters
  • selected the talks for the conference

You can see keynote & workshop info here, and the selected talks here.

If you still need a ticket, the last block of tickets are on sale NOW.

If you want to attend the conference then register ASAP. Tickets will go quick and once they’re gone, they’re gone. To register go here and purchase either a Last Call or Last Call + Workshop ticket.

June 11, 2015

Selenium Conf 2015 Details

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 4:00 pm UTC

The Selenium Conf 2015 website is live!

You can now:

– purchase tickets (while supplies last)

– find out venue information

– submit a talk

– learn more about our talk selection process (tl;dr it is a blind review process to encourage diversity)

What are you waiting for? Go to the conference website already!

May 13, 2015

Selenium Conf 2015 – Save The Date

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 4:23 pm UTC

Selenium Conf is coming to Portland, Oregon this year!

It will be happening on September 8, 9, and 10. Mark your calendars.

Stay tuned for details!

February 8, 2015


Filed under: Uncategorized — shs96c @ 2:15 pm UTC

Every year, Jetbrains are kind enough to donate an OSS license for IntelliJ to the Selenium project. As part of that process, they’ve asked that we review the product and (kudos to them!) have been clear that they hope we’re open and honest. So, I’ll be open and honest.

When I tell people that I’m a professional Java developer, people in some circles make sympathetic noises and (sometimes) jokingly refer to how painful my coding life must be. After all, there are several far trendier and hipper languages, from Ruby, various flavours of Javascript, Python, Haskell, and even other languages running on the JVM such as Scala and Clojure. I tend to agree that Java is a relatively unexciting language as it’s generally practiced — Java 8 contains a wealth of goodies that lots of people won’t be using for years since they’ve still got to support Java 6(!) apps. Where I disagree with the detractors is that using Java is something to feel sorry for a developer for: Java on its own isn’t much fun, Java and IntelliJ is one of my favourite programming experiences.

I’ve been using Java since the (very) late 90s, and have been using IntelliJ off-and-on since 2003 or so. In the intervening just-over-a-decade, what started as a tool that crossed the Rubicon of “being able to do refactoring” has matured. It has literally changed the way I write code: I now use the “Introduce Variable” refactoring to avoid needing to do initial assignments of values to variables as a matter of course. Indeed, with IntelliJ, I frequently stop thinking about the programming language and start thinking about the structure of the solution. Its refactorings make exploring large scale changes easy and entirely reliable, and once the restructurings are complete, I can jump to symbols with ease.

Code exploration is aided by the simple and quick ways IntelliJ can find usages, and it’s simple to find unused code as method declarations get highlighted in a different shade to used ones. The integrated debugger is sufficiently capable that, coupled with unit tests, it’s normally pretty easy to figure out why some odd behaviour is happening. And, speaking of unit tests, the UI is clear and (I find) intuitive and easy to use.

And those users of fancy-pants languages such as Clojure, Ruby, Python and Javascript (and PHP) can get plugins that extend IntelliJ’s capabilities and insight into those languages. Although it’s been a long time since I’ve had to deal with Spring and JEE, when I do IJ has my back, grokking the config files. The maven and gradle integration appears to work too, though Selenium uses CrazyFun and is migrating to Buck, so I’ve seldom any need to

It’s not all wonder and joy. On large, multi-module codebases, IntelliJ seems to spend too long building caches. Activity Monitor on the Mac suggests it’s doing this in a single threaded manner, which is wasteful on a multicored machine. Switching away from IJ, doing something on the command line involving source control and then switching back is a sure-fire way to make it rebuild the caches, making it unresponsive. Extending IntelliJ by writing plugins is a black art — the documentation is scattered and appears out of date, making getting started on writing one hard.

Overall, though, I love IntelliJ. On the Selenium project, it’s the IDE of choice, and I’ve been incredibly productive in it. Thank you, Jetbrains, for a wonderful tool.

December 23, 2014

Selenium Hangout 6 Recap

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 1:28 am UTC

01:35 – 9:45 W3C Update
Notes from most recent W3C Meeting
– changes to the get_attribute method call
– screenshots (changing to viewport only, eventually will support whole page)
The WebDriver W3C working group has a GitHub repo now
– WebDriver will move from a “REST-ish” to a more “RESTful” interface

11:23 – 16:00 Selenium 3 Status Update

16:05 – 17:10 Marionette (FirefoxdDiver rewrite) testing help 
Marionette Roadmap

17:20 – 19:27 ChemistryKit rewrite
Announcement blog post

17:28 – 20:24 Visual Testing Part 1
Getting Started with Visual Testing
Applitools (visual testing cloud solution built on top of WebDriver)

20:25 – 23:47 Selenium Guidebook in Java!
The Selenium Guidebook

23:52 – 29:51 Visual Testing Part 2
Web Consistency Testing
Why MogoTest won’t be open sourcing it’s code after shutting down
Michael Tamm’s GTAC talk on Fighting Layout Bugs
Getting Started with Visual Testing

May 19, 2014

Selenium Hangout 5 Recap

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 10:44 pm UTC

0:00 – 01:10 Intro

1:11 – 13:00 WebDriver W3C Spec & Selenium 3 Update

  • Progress on the spec, still a work in progress
  • No user facing changes to the Selenium API as a result
  • Trying to pair the spec and Selenium 3 together
  • If all goes well, the spec and Selenium 3 could drop during Selenium Conf (fingers crossed)

13:01 – 24:10 Selenium Conf 2014 Update

24:11 – 39:00 Discussion about 5 Hidden Costs Of Selenium Whitepaper from Telerik

February 24, 2014

Announcing Selenium Conf ’14: Bangalore, India

Filed under: Conference — shs96c @ 9:13 pm UTC

It makes me enormously happy and proud to announce that the Selenium Conference 2014 will be held in Bangalore on the 4-6 September. I’m looking forward to seeing you there!

One of the plans we’ve had from the very beginning for SeConf was that it was going to be a conference for the community of people who make Selenium such a fun project to work on. One way to do this was to host the conference where the largest groups of people using Selenium are found. We kicked off the first conference in San Francisco mainly because of the large number of Selenium users there (and, I’ll be honest, because that’s where the organising team had the most experience and contacts!)

In Europe, that large pool was London, so we held the second conference there. We had originally planned for the third conference to be in New York, but that proved to be a little too expensive, so we moved it North a little to Boston. Essentially, the pattern is that we alternate between the US one year and The Rest of the World the other.

That brings us to the planning for Selenium Conference this year. We had a look at the data available to us, and noticed that there were two areas of the world that it would be great to take the conference to. Selenium Camp, hosted in Kiev each year, does a great job of catering to one of these groups, so that leaves the second.

It’s India’s turn. :)

Thank you to everyone who’s already poured so much heart and spirit into this conference. We’ll be putting up a call for papers and more details soon, so please stay tuned!

February 7, 2014

Selenium Hangout 4 Recap

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 3:34 pm UTC

Here’s a recap from the latest Selenium Hangout panel discussion. To submit questions for future hangouts, you can message us on Twitter (@seleniumhangout) or e-mail us (

David Burns (@AutomatedTester)
Kevin Menard (@nirvdrum)
Dave Haeffner (@TourDeDave)


1:30-16:51: How to handle screenshots across different drivers
tl;dr driver specific issues due to a lacking standard and missing API

  • This is getting addressed in World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) spec which is under development
  • E-mail use-cases you would like to see in the spec to

17:30-22:40 : Internet Explorer (IE) 9 pitfalls and how to avoid them
tl;dr use 32-bit IE (if you’re not) and report issues to Selenium Issues

22:50-28:30 How do you do image and video comparison testing?
tl;dr straight image comparison is a flawed strategy, but there’s a better way — also, Selenium’s not the best tool for the job

Resources mentioned:

28:58-38:15 How do you get started with Selenium?
tl;dr pick a language you feel comfortable with, choose an editor that makes you productive, and dig into the available resources

Recommended resources:

38:23-42:50 Selenium 3 Update
tl;dr still a work in progress, steadily moving forward, a big update will likely be required

43:15-44:00 Conference Update
tl;dr nothing finalized, hoping to do it internationally, but US is a fallback; still working on options (will know soon)

44:10-45:20 Mobile Changes to the Selenium project
tl;dr Android and iPhone Selenium drivers deprecated in favor of other compatible libraries

Compatible libraries:

45:20-47:30 New Mobile Selenium Drivers
tl;dr RIM (BlackBerry Smartphones) and Microsoft (Windows phones)

December 24, 2013

Android and iOS Support

Filed under: Technical — shs96c @ 4:18 pm UTC

TL;DR: We’re retiring Selenium’s own AndroidDriver and iPhoneDriver in favour of any of Selendroid, iosdriver and Appium. If you’re using one of Selenium’s own mobile drivers, please evaluate one of these alternatives.

The longer version:

In 2007, Steve Jobs announced the iPhone and changed the mobile Web from a curiosity to something the mainstream wanted and used. Current trends suggest that mobile Web usage will surpass desktop usage in the not too distant future. Which is a long way of saying the mobile Web is going to be a big part of the future of your sites and that it’d be an extremely wise idea to test them on mobile devices.

The Selenium project responded to the rise of the mobile web by working to produce WebDriver implementations for both iOS and Android. The first lines of the iPhoneDriver (which also worked on the iPad) were added to the project early in 2009. The AndroidDriver was added in June 2010, and was primarily developed by engineers at Google. To this day you can download the official Android SDK and find “Google WebDriver” as one of the optional extras you can download.

After the initial work on the mobile drivers, something interesting happened. Experimental extensions and modifications to the drivers were made outside of the selenium project. The first one of these that I was involved with was “nativedriver“. This took the novel approach of allowing users to interact with the native UI of the phone, be it Android or iOS, using the familiar WebDriver APIs. The first time I saw it, I thought it was madness, but the engineers working on it soon convinced me that it made sense. And guess what? They were right.

Sadly, after proving the idea was viable and workable, the NativeDriver project ran out of steam, but it set the scene for three projects that have taken the idea and run with it to create remarkably capable pieces of mobile testing software: Selendroid, iosdriver and Appium. All three of these allow a tester familiar with the WebDriver APIs to test mobile apps on iOS and Android. Not only native ones, but also hybrid or pure web-based ones too. They’ve recently been joined by the Windows Phone WebDriver, which allows testing of mobile web apps on WinPhone 8.

All of these projects have something in common: they’re far more active, more capable and have pushed further than the equivalent code in the main selenium project. In fact, some of the members of the selenium team that contributed to both AndroidDriver and iPhoneDriver are now also working on those other projects. There’s work being done to maintain interoperability between the different drivers, allowing users to chose which framework is most appropriate for their needs without fear of their tests needing major rework.

This means that keeping the existing Android and iPhone drivers within the Selenium project isn’t helping our users. The alternatives are better, and keeping “official” drivers within the project muddies the water. Worse, the selenium developers are slow at making fixes to those drivers, which is incredibly frustrating for everyone involved. Because of this, the Selenium project has deleted the code for those drivers from its repository and we recommend you evaluate and use one of the alternatives.

Of course, the code will still live in our repo’s history, so if you’d like to build them yourself, then it’s still possible. The last version with the iPhoneDriver is ef9d578, and the last one with the Android source is 00a3c7d. We’ve uploaded a version of the AndroidDriver built from that revision to the downloads page to save you having to do so yourself.

These changes do not mean that we don’t support mobile as a project. It just means that we support the best implementations of mobile WebDriver, and those aren’t written as part of the Selenium project.

November 1, 2013

Selenium Hangout 3 Recap

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 3:20 am UTC

Here is a recap of our most recent Selenium Hangout where we answered a grab bag of questions ranging from how to use Selenium within your existing workflow down to nitty-gritty details around performance and deprecated functions.

Be sure to tune into our Twitter feed to find out details about our next Hangout.

And if your question didn’t get answered, we encourage you to hop on IRC and ask it there. Not sure what that means or how to do it? Then read this.


David Burns (@AutomatedTester)

Dave Haeffner (@TourDeDave)

Jim Evans (@jimevansmusic)

Kevin Menard (@nirvdrum)


00:00 – 05:50

Preamble and Introductions

05:51 – 18:09

Question 1 – For a team getting started with Selenium what are some typical workflows for how product code is built, and Selenium tests built, as well as for when product code is modified and Selenium test modified?

18:10 – 34:15

Question 2 – Recommendations for testing responsive design?

34:15 – 37:44

Question 3 – Was VerifyText removed?

37:45 – 46:20

Question 4 – Why is IE9 slow and hard to use and recommendations for alleviate this?

46:21 – 50:11

Question 5 – ChromeDriver2 seems less robust than it’s predecessor, thoughts on this?

50:12 – 53:39

Question 6 – The Selenium documentation is out of date, how can I contribute a fix for this?

53:40 – 54:31

How to help out with the Selenium Conference?

Links mentioned

Figuring Out What To Test

How to get involved with the Selenium Conference

Where to contribute to Selenium Documentation

Next Page »

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