Official Selenium Blog

July 29, 2016

Announcing Selenium 3.0-beta1

Filed under: Releases — shs96c @ 1:20 am UTC

At SeleniumConf in 2013, we announced that a new major version of Selenium would be released “by Christmas”. Fortunately, we never said which Christmas, as it has taken us a while to make all the changes we wanted to make! We’re excited to announce the release of the first beta — Selenium 3.0.0-beta1.

We’d love you to try it out on your projects, and provide us with feedback on where the rough edges are before we ship the 3.0 itself! Please remember that this is a beta release, so your feedback is incredibly helpful and valuable in order to help us smooth any rough edges.

For the last six years we’ve been advising users to switch to the newer WebDriver APIs and to stop using the original RC APIs. With Selenium 3.0, the original implementation of RC has been removed, replaced by one that sits on top of WebDriver. For many users, this change will go completely unnoticed, as they’re no longer using the RC APIs. For those of you who still are, we’ve done our best to make the change as smooth as possible, but we welcome high quality bug reports to help us fix any problems that occur. Maven users will need to add a dependency on the new “leg-rc” package to access the old RC APIs.

There are some other changes that you might need to be aware of:

  • You’ll need to be running Java 8 to use the Java pieces of Selenium. This is the oldest version of Java officially supported by Oracle, so hopefully you’re using it already!
  • Support for Firefox is via Mozilla’s geckodriver.
  • Support for Safari is provided on macOS (Sierra or later) via Apple’s own safaridriver.
  • Support for Edge is provided by MS through their webdriver server.
  • Only versions 9 or above of IE are supported. Earlier versions may work, but are no longer supported as MS no longer supports them.

We’ll be posting more information about Selenium 3.0 to this blog soon, but until then if you’re interested in learning more then a recent webinar by Simon is a great place to start.

June 23, 2016

Fall Selenium Conf, Save the Date & Call for Speakers!

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 12:09 pm UTC

We’re excited to announce that we’ve finally determined where and when Selenium Conf will be happening this Fall.

Our initial goal was to bring the event to a new country, but for a number of reasons that proved more challenging than we’d hoped. But in 2012 we had the 2nd annual Selenium Conf in London, and we’re pleased to be bringing it back there this year!

The conference will be held at The Mermaid in downtown London on November 14-16:

  • The 14th will be all-day pre-conference workshops
  • The 15th-16th will be the conference

Go here to sign up for the email list for conference updates (e.g., when tickets go on sale) as well as submit a talk. Call for speakers are open from now until July 29th.

February 8, 2016

Selenium Conf India 2016 Update

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 5:47 pm UTC

Selenium Conf India is happening this June 24-26 in Bangalore, India.

Tickets, call for speakers, and sponsorship slots are now available!

http://2016.seleniumconf.in/

 

December 21, 2015

Selenium Conf India — Save The Date!

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 4:28 pm UTC

In our last update we mentioned there will be 2 Selenium Confs in 2016 — one in India, another somewhere else (TBD).

Well, we are pleased to announce the official dates and location for Selenium Conf India!

When: June 24th & 25th, 2016

Where: Bangalore, India (at The Chancery Pavilion Hotel)

Mark you calendars! We’ll have more details as they become available (e.g., call for speakers, ticket sales, etc.). To get the latest updates, be sure to sign up for the Selenium Conf mailing list.

November 6, 2015

Selenium Conf 2016

Filed under: Conference — Tour de Dave @ 5:26 pm UTC

Interested in learning what’s in store for Se Conf 2016? Then be sure to read this write-up from the Conference Organizers.

Also, if you want to receive email notifications about the conference (e.g., when and where it will be, call for speakers, ticket sales, etc.) then go here and complete the sign-up form.

August 8, 2015

Selenium Conf 2015 Update

Filed under: Conference — Tour de Dave @ 3:00 pm UTC

Selenium 2015 is just around the corner (September 8-10). Since our last post we have:

  • confirmed Keynote speakers
  • finalized workshop presenters
  • selected the talks for the conference

You can see keynote & workshop info here, and the selected talks here.

If you still need a ticket, the last block of tickets are on sale NOW.

If you want to attend the conference then register ASAP. Tickets will go quick and once they’re gone, they’re gone. To register go here and purchase either a Last Call or Last Call + Workshop ticket.

June 11, 2015

Selenium Conf 2015 Details

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 4:00 pm UTC

The Selenium Conf 2015 website is live!

You can now:

– purchase tickets (while supplies last)

– find out venue information

– submit a talk

– learn more about our talk selection process (tl;dr it is a blind review process to encourage diversity)

What are you waiting for? Go to the conference website already!

May 13, 2015

Selenium Conf 2015 – Save The Date

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 4:23 pm UTC

Selenium Conf is coming to Portland, Oregon this year!

It will be happening on September 8, 9, and 10. Mark your calendars.

Stay tuned for details!

February 8, 2015

IntelliJ

Filed under: Uncategorized — shs96c @ 2:15 pm UTC

Every year, Jetbrains are kind enough to donate an OSS license for IntelliJ to the Selenium project. As part of that process, they’ve asked that we review the product and (kudos to them!) have been clear that they hope we’re open and honest. So, I’ll be open and honest.

When I tell people that I’m a professional Java developer, people in some circles make sympathetic noises and (sometimes) jokingly refer to how painful my coding life must be. After all, there are several far trendier and hipper languages, from Ruby, various flavours of Javascript, Python, Haskell, and even other languages running on the JVM such as Scala and Clojure. I tend to agree that Java is a relatively unexciting language as it’s generally practiced — Java 8 contains a wealth of goodies that lots of people won’t be using for years since they’ve still got to support Java 6(!) apps. Where I disagree with the detractors is that using Java is something to feel sorry for a developer for: Java on its own isn’t much fun, Java and IntelliJ is one of my favourite programming experiences.

I’ve been using Java since the (very) late 90s, and have been using IntelliJ off-and-on since 2003 or so. In the intervening just-over-a-decade, what started as a tool that crossed the Rubicon of “being able to do refactoring” has matured. It has literally changed the way I write code: I now use the “Introduce Variable” refactoring to avoid needing to do initial assignments of values to variables as a matter of course. Indeed, with IntelliJ, I frequently stop thinking about the programming language and start thinking about the structure of the solution. Its refactorings make exploring large scale changes easy and entirely reliable, and once the restructurings are complete, I can jump to symbols with ease.

Code exploration is aided by the simple and quick ways IntelliJ can find usages, and it’s simple to find unused code as method declarations get highlighted in a different shade to used ones. The integrated debugger is sufficiently capable that, coupled with unit tests, it’s normally pretty easy to figure out why some odd behaviour is happening. And, speaking of unit tests, the UI is clear and (I find) intuitive and easy to use.

And those users of fancy-pants languages such as Clojure, Ruby, Python and Javascript (and PHP) can get plugins that extend IntelliJ’s capabilities and insight into those languages. Although it’s been a long time since I’ve had to deal with Spring and JEE, when I do IJ has my back, grokking the config files. The maven and gradle integration appears to work too, though Selenium uses CrazyFun and is migrating to Buck, so I’ve seldom any need to

It’s not all wonder and joy. On large, multi-module codebases, IntelliJ seems to spend too long building caches. Activity Monitor on the Mac suggests it’s doing this in a single threaded manner, which is wasteful on a multicored machine. Switching away from IJ, doing something on the command line involving source control and then switching back is a sure-fire way to make it rebuild the caches, making it unresponsive. Extending IntelliJ by writing plugins is a black art — the documentation is scattered and appears out of date, making getting started on writing one hard.

Overall, though, I love IntelliJ. On the Selenium project, it’s the IDE of choice, and I’ve been incredibly productive in it. Thank you, Jetbrains, for a wonderful tool.

December 23, 2014

Selenium Hangout 6 Recap

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tour de Dave @ 1:28 am UTC

01:35 – 9:45 W3C Update
Notes from most recent W3C Meeting
Highlights:
– changes to the get_attribute method call
– screenshots (changing to viewport only, eventually will support whole page)
The WebDriver W3C working group has a GitHub repo now
– WebDriver will move from a “REST-ish” to a more “RESTful” interface

11:23 – 16:00 Selenium 3 Status Update

16:05 – 17:10 Marionette (FirefoxdDiver rewrite) testing help 
Marionette Roadmap

17:20 – 19:27 ChemistryKit rewrite
Announcement blog post

17:28 – 20:24 Visual Testing Part 1
Getting Started with Visual Testing
Applitools (visual testing cloud solution built on top of WebDriver)

20:25 – 23:47 Selenium Guidebook in Java!
The Selenium Guidebook

23:52 – 29:51 Visual Testing Part 2
Web Consistency Testing
Why MogoTest won’t be open sourcing it’s code after shutting down
Michael Tamm’s GTAC talk on Fighting Layout Bugs
Getting Started with Visual Testing

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